What Every Mother Should Know about Modern Orthodontics

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One of the beginning-of-the-year routines many mothers will be familiar with is figuring out when to book their kids in for a check-up at the dentist. And if your children’s adult teeth have grown in crooked or irregular, you will probably be wondering if this is the year the dentist takes you aside and tells you it might be time for orthodontics. 

If you had braces yourself as a child, you may be dreading this moment. Braces are no fun for anyone, and in the middle school years especially kids can be extremely sensitive to anything that might make them stand out among their peers. And if you don’t have insurance, there’s also the expense to consider. 

The good news is that orthodontic technology has developed by leaps and bounds over the past twenty years, and thanks to recent technical breakthroughs and a greater range of materials available, your orthodontist in Hamilton can make sure that your kids have a much easier time of it than you did.

Custom Brackets Offer Greater Comfort

One of the problems with older styles of braces is that they were produced on a one-size-fits-all basis. These braces had to be adapted to the particular needs of each patient, but they operated less smoothly and caused a great deal more friction — which in turn caused a lot more discomfort. 

Modern braces can incorporate custom brackets made from metal or porcelain to fit your child’s unique mouth. This creates less friction, meaning that your child won’t have to suffer the same kinds of aches and pains patients in previous generations had to go through. 

No Elastics Means Fewer Visits

If you had to wear braces as a child, you probably have visceral memories of the little elastics that were used to keep the wire in place while closing up space between teeth, or keeping space closed. These elastics needed to be changed regularly, and made cleaning the teeth even more difficult. 

One of the advantages that modern braces have is that they are increasingly designed to work without elastics. Companies like Insignia have designed brackets that use a slide mechanism that allows the wire to move more freely while still firmly connecting the archwires to the brackets.

This system is not only more comfortable and discrete, it also means fewer trips to the dentist for elastics to be changed — which you and your child are both likely to appreciate!

More Subtle Options

For middle schoolers and young adults, one of the most frustrating aspects of having braces is simply the aesthetics. At a time in life when appearance seems to matter more than anything else, having large amounts of hardware in your mouth can be very embarrassing. 

Fortunately, there are a growing number of clear options that make braces less noticeable, allowing your child to have their teeth straightened more discretely. 

If the very memory of having braces as a kid makes you wince, you’ll be sympathetic with your own child’s reluctance to undergo the procedure. Fortunately, technological improvements mean that you have plenty of options that can make the experience more comfortable and less embarrassing for your children than it was for you. 

About Author

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LaDonna Dennis

LaDonna Dennis is the founder and creator of Mom Blog Society. She wears many hats. She is a Homemaker*Blogger*Crafter*Reader*Pinner*Friend*Animal Lover* Former writer of Frost Illustrated and, Cancer...SURVIVOR! LaDonna is happily married to the love of her life, the mother of 3 grown children and "Grams" to 3 grandchildren. She adores animals and has four furbabies: Makia ( a German Shepherd, whose mission in life is to be her attached to her hip) and Hachie, (an OCD Alaskan Malamute, and Akia (An Alaskan Malamute) who is just sweet as can be. And Sassy, a four-month-old German Shepherd who has quickly stolen her heart and become the most precious fur baby of all times. Aside from the humans in her life, LaDonna's fur babies are her world.

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